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Nomads admit financial woes

Despite landing a milestone K70 million sponsorship from Japanese car dealers, Be Forward, Mighty Wanderers are sailing in troubled waters on the financial front as they are yet to settle their players’ signing-on fees.

The Nomads registered 25 players this season, but the club has failed to settle the players’ dues, forcing an intense reaction from the players.

The players left last Friday’s training session fuming at the officials, for allegedly failing to settle their dues.

In an interview yesterday, Wanderers general secretary, Mike Butao, admitted that the club was yet to complete payment of the players’ dues.

“It is true. Simply, we only ask for transfer fees from our sponsors. But there is a limit to the amount of money the sponsors allocate for each player. Therefore, we mobilise money on our own to pay for the balance through several initiatives mainly through gate collections,” he said.

“We are in this situation because the postponement of our Super League games has disturbed us. We had set targets to raise the money through the matches that have been postponed recently. We owe a number of players their signing-on fees. We do not want to rip them off. When we resume our games, we will mobilise the resources and settle the players’ dues.”

Butao could not reveal how much the club owes the players and the amount of money they have received from their sponsors Be Forward so far.

However, reports suggest that the club receives K5 million per month from the sponsors.

Meanwhile, the Nomads’ Cameroonian import, Lionel Asu, has expressed frustration with the situation, stating he was struggling to survive and focus on his game.

“We had an agreement that the club would pay my full signing-on fees by May 31. They just paid part of the money and promised to complete paying the balance before the deadline we agreed. But up to now I am yet to be updated on the situation. Whenever, I try to approach the officials, I receive a cold response,” he said.

“As a professional footballer, I have responsibilities back home therefore, I feel like I am wasting my time here. I am struggling to survive here and I am failing to assist my family back home. If they do not settle my dues in time, I am ready to go back home. We agreed that if they don’t pay me by the deadline, I am free to go.”

Asu also alleged that he was locked out at his lodge in Mpingwe on Monday after the club failed to settle the bills at the lodge.

He was rescued by a Wanderers supporter who paid the bills and had his room re-opened and his possessions returned.

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