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Tshala Muana inspired many artists – Soldier

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Lucius Banda

Soldier Lucius Banda Sunday described Congolese singer and dancer Tshala Muana as one of the few remaining female legends in Africa and that her death is a big blow to the creative industry.

Lucius, who has just released his 20th album titled Love and Hate also recalled that Tshala Muana once visited Malawi and that her performances attracted huge audiences.

“I remember that during her tour, she was involved in a road accident at Bembeke in Dedza.

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Her songs were popular then and hearing of her death yesterday (Saturday) I was shocked because she was among the remaining female legends,” he said.

Lucius said many artists of his generation grew up listening to Congolese artists such as Tshala Muana and that they were inspired to do rumba.

“I grew up listening to Tshala Muana and other Congolese artists such as Kandabongoman, Pepe Kalle and others. I started as a reggae musician but overtime I also moved to other genres such as rumba and it is because of artists like Tshala Muana,” he said.

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The famous singer and dancer died on Saturday morning at the age of 64, according to her producer and companion Claude Mashala. “In the early hours of this morning (Saturday) the good Lord has made the decision to call back Tshala Muana,” Mashala posted on Facebook.

The BBC reported that Tshala Muana is considered the Queen of Mutuashi, a traditional music and dance from her native Kasai region.

She was famous for several songs such as ‘Dezo Dezo’ which continues to enjoy airplay in some of the media stations in the country, ‘Karibu Yangu’, ‘Malu’ and ‘Tshianza’.

Tshala Muana toured widely overseas, won several awards on the national, continental and global scene and recorded over 20 albums.

Her music also appeared in the soundtrack of the popular 1987 Congolese musical film La Vie est Belle and Aya of Yop City.

Tshala Muana, whose real name was Élisabeth Tshala Muana Muidikay, was also often affectionately called Mamu National, which means the nation’s mother, for her vocal defence of the rights of women and children in the Congolese parliament

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