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Use internet to view another PC

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I call him LiveIT and not Liveson because that sounds more tech and is metaphorically well-dressed; that is beside the point; he is a database maharishi.

The man who is called Ophara Ohiyana (O.O) amongst his Facebook confrères has coded School Management, Hospital Administration, Accounting, Payroll and Invoice applications.

Recently LiveIT called and immodestly announced that he rarely visits his customers these days; he fixes issues with his software by remote control. When I wanted to know which witchdoctor in his Phalombe home area had administered the concoction that awoke the magic, he snubbed my cynicism and told me he was using TeamViewer.

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Like any other programmer would, he took me through the piece of software as if he had co-authored it. When he was done, a ton of ignorance had just taken flight.

According to Wikipedia, TeamViewer GmbH was founded in 2005 in Goppingen, Germany. The UK-based private equity firm, Permira, acquired TeamViewer in 2014.

Tech analysts and industry experts disagree almost on everything, however, when it comes to TeamViewer, most agree that TeamViewer is a premium solution for remote support, access and online collaboration.

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The general accepted viewpoint is that it is the best, most powerful and intuitive solution on the market.

TeamViewer takes advantage of the glorified worldwide interconnection of computers (internet) to create a simplified Virtual Private Network (VPN) between say your computer at home and the laptop on your office desk. All I just said in that claptrap is that TeamViewer lets you magically view and manipulate the contents of your home desktop when you travel.

The software is totally free of charge if you are using it for non-commercial purposes. The corporate world has to fork out money for the great service. The philosophy is simple, the individual users are marketing tools that spread the good gospel of TeamViewer to corporations. They area an environment that gives feedback that immeasurably help improve the software solution.

In English this is analogous to Airtel broadband, TNM eWiMax and Glove Internet offering free internet services to Computer Crosstalk. In turn, the column may virtually ‘market’ for them and can also point out areas where improvements can be made. Wouldn’t it be so glorious?

Thank You Airtel

In my recent article ‘The greatest goofs of 2016’, Airtel Money made the list. The marketing kahuna at the company personally telephone and explained matters. The money was refunded then and there. Thank you so much for being responsive; that is what I call service.

That is great; I now know that my computer evangelism is not in vain. The thing is that if a tree fell in the forest and there was nobody to hear its thunderous fall, it would make no noise.

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