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Editorial CommentOpinion & Analysis

Violence has no place in democracy

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BY TIMES EDITORIAL:

The hope and bright enthusiasm that came with multiparty politics in the country has dissipated into excruciating despair for many and utter anger for a few, hazarding agitation for change.

The promise of dignity, peace and development through the engine of democratic governance has been mercilessly shattered and, with time, this could become much worse.

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Not surprising, for the umpteenth time, Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) Cadets are in the news for obvious reasons.

Yesterday, DPP Cadets assaulted Blantyre City South Member of Parliament Allan Ngumuya during a military parade marking 54 years of independence in Blantyre.

Surely, the DPP government and its faithful will never cease to amaze the public with their political brutality.

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In the not-too-distant inglorious past, a much-aspersed DPP regime not only cobbled together legislation meant to take us back to the Stone Age but paraded panga-wielding .thugs in the streets of Blantyre just to intimidate the citizenry when the sense of disillusionment with Bingu wa Mutharika’s leadership was pervasive in the country.

The truth, however, is that Malawians agreed to follow the democratic path when they voted in multiparty politics in 1994.

And one of the tenets of democracy is accommodating dissenting views.

The assault on Ngumuya is a clear sign that DPP leadership – and those before it – has resisted demand from the governed to unreservedly embrace enhanced political ideologies aimed at improved democratic and developmental outcomes.

But Malawi does not belong to DPP.

So, while it is apparent that Malawi is the most abused country by all sorts of rogues, on a positive note, DPP authorities and their rascals need to know that the country is in a multiparty democracy and this entails that every citizen must enjoy basic freedoms as enshrined in the Republican Constitution regardless of party colour.

Brutality, intimidation and violence are public enemies in a democracy that must be zealously loathed, hated and reviled; there are a grouchy weed needing total weeding out or complete obliteration from earthly existence to borrow from the common parlance of advertisers of pest busters.

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