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We are the solution we seek

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It is human nature to gravitate towards bad news over good. It is human nature to complain and glorify pain despite having an array of opportunities that point them to greater glory. The highway to success is to neither look east nor west but to look forward with vision and optimism. People that provide solutions are those who cannot be deterred with the word ‘no’. They are ready to invest where many would dare to and that makes a difference.

In life, we all keep on waiting for others to do things for us; no wonder, we blame other people when we find ourselves in uncomforting situations. But, in life, success demands that we be the architects of the future we want; we be the earth-moving machines that crush all stumbling blocks standing on our way to success. To expect and rely on other people is to lose focus and a sheer demonstration of our inability to face huddles and move on. When our mind is stuck on needing support and affection always, we easily lose and we easily get disappointed.

The University of Malawi’s The Polytechnic Finance and Corporate Strategy Professor, James Khomba, was right; we must solve our own problems. Patrice Lumumba of Congo challenged Africans to write their own history. We are bound to be encouraged by the words of Jomo Kenyatta when he took the view that, as Africans, we could only be dignified if we are independent and we charted our own course

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If we are facing hunger, let us embark on irrigation farming and avert the hunger than calling for declaration of state of disasters all just for foreign institutions and governments to come to our rescue. We are the solution that we seek. Ask Rwanda how it was neglected the time it needed foreign intervention most. Rwanda eventually realised that stopping the genocide was only possible through Rwandese than anybody else.

Lumumba well explains the Rwanda story.

“The Rwandese war was without precedent. For 100 days, the international community watched the event as if they sat in the Roman coliseum watching lions devouring Christians. They did nothing. For 100 days, not even we Africans rose to support the Rwandese. For 100 days, newspapers and televisions was awash with bodies floating in rivers. For 100 days, even those who thought that religion and Christianity could save them, seeking refuge in the churches were killed by their own pastors demonstrating again that the blood of ethnicity is sometimes thicker than the blood of Christ.

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“These all happened as the international community watched and did nothing… when they were required to be present France was not there, the government in Brussels was not there, the organisation of African Unity was eloquent in its silence, the United States of America was absent, the United Kingdom was absent, they were all absent. It took the Rwandese led by Paul Kagame and his comrades in arms to literally save themselves when the international community had already written the obituary that Rwanda was just yet another country that could not run herself.”

Lumumba goes on to explain: “But the Rwandese once again recognised and realised that the solution had to be home-grown and that is why the gachacha courts were created to look at justice from a different perspective. The Rwandese recognised that an eye for an eye only makes the world blind

“Today, Rwanda shines in Africa. When you want to talk of a country where efficiency is the name of the game, Rwanda comes to mind. Today, when you want a city that is as clean and as glittering, Kigali is the city. Today, when you want to talk about a country where people meaningfully participate in the affairs on their country, Rwanda is the country.”

Malawi has even a fare share of stories that vindicate that only us can find solutions to the problems we face. When William Kamkwamba saw darkness in his village, he did not curse poverty or Electricity Supply Corporation in Malawi. Not even his failure to proceed with education could take him back. He built a windmill out of junk and brought power to his village. When hunger victimised his home, he did not curse the clouds for failing to pour down rain; he built a larger windmill that played a crucial role in irrigation.

We are the solution that we seek. Why do we keep on looking to others when we can make a difference? Why do we keep on mourning that our economy is failing, yet we are the ones that can fix the economy? This is the time we challenge our thinking. Life will never be kind with us; we have to shape life to be kind with us.

We all have talents that if properly harnessed and utilised could be a solution to the problems we are facing. Jeffrey Fox enlightens us: “If you have an instinct for finding fish, you could become a for-hire fishing guide. If you have wonderful organisational skills, you could build a party planning business. If you have an aptitude for mathematics, you could start a jet airplane fractional ownership business, a gambling casino or a tutoring business to teach kids algebra”

We are the solution that we need and no one will provide solutions to our problems but ourselves. Barack Obama was right; we are the ones we have been waiting for.

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